Let’s celebrate ‘the Great Escape… 23.00 hours 31 Jan 2020’

 

Let’s celebrate ‘the Great Escape… 23.00 hours 31 Jan 2020’

Today, Friday January 31st, is Freedom Day, so crack open a bottle of Remainer tears, feast on a side of non-vegan, un-Fair Trade British beef and celebrate our release from the Euro-federalist prison that has held us captive for the last 47 years.

There’s already much gnashing of teeth and wailing in Brussels. Pointless bureaucrats realise that they’re going to be pushed off the gravy train, as one of their net contributors won’t be mugged for an annual £39 billion any more. Britain’s departure hastens the demise of the ailing federalist project, leading the way for others to follow suit.

No wonder Guy Verhofstadt said he’d miss us.

The majority of us saw through the Grand Cuvée myth that Brexit would mean having to grub for worms and wear sackcloth. Ironically, the economic Armageddon threatened by Project Fear cultists has transmogrified into the greatest sense of optimism seen in this country since WWII. The shops are full of tomatoes and even the CBI, those low-wage Europhiliacs, reported the biggest surge in confidence on record amongst manufacturers, with a wall of corporate money flooding in, both nationally and globally.

A walloping majority

Boris has secured himself a walloping majority, which may last for two terms – hence the national sense that things are on the up. The EU though, languishes in a torpid, socialist stupor. While the rest of the world clamours for economic and social freedom, our European neighbours prefer stifling regulation and finger-wagging, I-told-you-so big state intrusion.

UK unemployment is at its lowest since 1974. Inflation is negligible, borrowing costs are moving southwards, productivity is rising and there are wage increases for the masses.

The Pound is appreciating proportionately and there is a resurgence in the residential property market, which has been in the doldrums for many years.

Most encouraging of all is that someone in the Treasury has read an economics book and learned that you can’t photocopy money to prop up an unproductive state sector. Hence, there’s been a meaningful drop in government borrowing. This is what I call a ‘golden scenario’.

Full speed ahead

This country can easily weather any Brexit-induced turbulence and is set to go full speed ahead. Special praise is reserved for the British public though, who despite accusations of bigotry and ignorance from our elitist ‘superiors’ – the BBC, Gina Miller, Hugh Laurie, et al. – decided that sovereignty and independence were preferable to being patronised by a bunch of over-incomed, brainless attention-hogs.

Meanwhile, panic stalks the well-upholstered offices of Brussels, as they scratch around for some euros to fill the gap from our contribution. Our economy is larger than the 18 smallest EU states combined. While before there may have been 28 nations in the EU, effectively now there are only ten. This feeds the EU paranoia that we will ‘encourager les autres’. Watch out for a future Franxit, Germxit and the intriguing prospect of a Spanxit.

The EU budget sinkhole will only grow wider as countries implode under the weight of their creaking economies.

Another quality lacking in the Brussels mafia is any hint of self-analysis. Do you think they question as to whether they didn’t give Cameron enough to sell his pro-European stance before the Referendum? Or why the unwashed UK populace were so ungrateful about handing over our fishing rights, heavy industries and criminal jurisdiction? Not a bit of it. These are hard-nosed, narcissistic, federalists who are pathological in their myopic objective of European political union. They care not one whit about the damage wrought against their own nations.

Britain shouldn’t worry

We shouldn’t worry. Britain is far more than the fifth largest global economy. For a start, everyone wants to speak our language. Greenwich Mean Time is the geo-temporal standard, while the whole world benefits from our scientific and engineering discoveries. Our 1000-year-old judicial system is the basis for that of every civilised nation and ambitious parents everywhere clamour to get their bright sprogs into our private schools. British cultural exports, such as music and literature, are accessed via the medium of our tech inventions.

Meanwhile, anyone wanting to ‘do a deal’ beats a path to London, the world’s premier financial centre.

Not bad for a country 11 times smaller than Argentina.

Across the way, Germany’s industrial might, powered at the expense of the southern EU countries, sputters to a halt. It’s a good thing they have nice weather down south, since the Mediterranean bloc can boast nearly 50% youth unemployment. Preaching the utopian EU ideal to someone Greek or Spanish will get you whacked with something much heavier than an aubergine.

The fact that Britain is set to overtake the EU countries when we leave the Union has become an obsession for the panjandrums of Brussels. With that sort of attitude, it’s hardly surprising that in all the years of the European proto-dictatorship, there’s only been 13 years of peace.

They bang on about the size of their so-called free market but what has it achieved in 47 years apart from recession and rules about wonky cucumbers? America has similar fundamentals and yet it has grown twice as fast as the EU, with half the unemployment rate.

Boris can use his heft to negotiate our EU trade deal from a position of strength, instead of the flimsy sell-out cobbled together by former Prime Minister May.

Nonetheless, Remainer bleating continues unabated, as if their feelings are more important than the country’s future. Instead of engaging in a collective sulk, they should join us in a rousing chorus of the hymn Jerusalem, uniting in the spirit of peace and harmony.

Let’s celebrate the Great Escape

Let’s celebrate the Great Escape at 23.00 hours, 31st January 2020, with English Sparkling wine and leave the last word to that great statesman, Sir Winston Churchill:

“We have our own dream and our own task. We are with Europe, but not of it. We are linked but not combined. We are interested and associated, but not absorbed. If Britain must choose between Europe and the open sea, she must always choose, the open sea”.